History of Glass and Ceramic

Objectives

This Curricular Unit, will examine from a broad standpoint, the most fundamental moments and changes in the course of the historical evolution of glass and ceramics. It will do so across the broadest spectrum imaginable, from the beginnings when ceramics and glass materials were started to be used and manipulated by men-made processes. The most important chronological periods and milestone dates for ceramics and glass production will be covered, trying also to enclose all the geographical important and key-point areas for the production and development of these materials. It will arrive at and give special emphasis on the study of contemporary creative approaches on both materials. The Portuguese contexts of ceramics and glass production will be approach and emphasized whenever possible.

General characterization

Code

12196

Credits

3.0

Responsible teacher

Catarina Paula Oliveira de Mattos Villamariz, Inês Alexandra Ramalho Coutinho

Hours

Weekly - 4

Total - 56

Teaching language

Inglês

Prerequisites

Available soon

Bibliography

HEIMANN, R.B., MAGGETTI, M. Ancient and Historical Ceramics. Materials, Technology, Art, and Culinary Traditions, Schweizerbart Science Publishers, 2014.

COOPER, E. Ten Thousand Years of Pottery, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 2000.

MOOR, Andrew Architectural Glass Art: form and technique in contemporary glass, Londres: Beazley, 1997.

REDOL, Pedro O Mosteiro da Batalha e o Vitral em Portugal nos séculos XV e XVI, Batalha: C.M., 2003.

TAIT, Hugh, Five Thousand Years of Glass, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004.

AMADO MENDES, J. (2002) A História do Vidro e do Cristal em Portugal. Lisboa: Edições Inapa. 

DRAHOTOVÁ, O. (1983) European glass: The development of hollow glassware through the ages. Prague: Artia.

TAIT, H. (1979) The Golden Age of Venetian glass. London: British Museum Publications.


VALENTE, V. (1950) O vidro em Portugal. Porto: Portucalense Editora.

Teaching method

The program of this course is presented in the form of expository materials with use of projected images; which images allow a better understanding of the contents, also serving to develop the visual and artistic culture of the students.

The evaluation includes a written work (50 %) and an oral presentation (50 %). The final grade is the weighted average of these two evaluation elements

Evaluation method

The program of this course is presented in the form of expository materials with use of projected images; which images allow a better understanding of the contents, also serving to develop the visual and artistic culture of the students.

This curricular unit is only composed by the Theoretical evaluation component.

The evaluation includes a written work (50 %) and an oral presentation and discussion (50 %). The final grade is the weighted average of these two evaluation elements.

The oral presentation lasts 10 min. and the discussion lasts approximately 10 min. The evaluation of both components will be made by the Responsible and Regent of the curricular unit.

Final Grade = (WW*0.5) + (OPD*0.5)

WW= written work

OPD= oral presentation and discussion


Subject matter

  • From the earliest ceramics to the invention of the potter''''s wheel.
  • Discovery of the glaze (Egypt), the Ceramics in Greece, the Ceramics from the East (The Great Terracotta Army, China)
  • The Roman Pottery (1st to 4th centuries), The Discovery of Porcelain, The Glazed Pottery of Iraq, The Development of Pottery in Medieval Europe.
  • Ceramics from the Early Modern Period and - Europe, America, Asia.
  • The Production of Ceramics in Portugal - The importance of architectural ceramic 
  • Arts and Crafts Movement of 1800, The Contemporary Ceramics
  • From glazes to Glass: experiences in the Antiquity to the Classic. The origins of glass blowing. The Roman Glass: main production centres and masterpieces.
  • The post-Roman period, focusing on the Medieval Period and the Renaissance (The Evolution of Glass in Italy (Venice, Murano, and Altare) in the Late Middle Ages and the Renaissance.)
  • Stained glass in Christian Europe (11th-16th centuries). The stained glass in Portugal in the 15th and 16th centuries.
  • Treaties and scientific glass (lens manufacturing and the execution of new mirrors, lenses, etc.)
  • The Pre-Industrial and Insdutrial Revolution and glass in the 19th and 20th centuries: mass production of containers and development of new and more resistant materials for use in construction. The manufacture of glass in Portugal: from Coina''''s factory to Marinha Grande.
  • Artistic glass in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the Glass Art Movement

Programs

Programs where the course is taught: