Logic Themes

Objectives

Development of capacities of critical and conceptual analysis, by focusing on fundamental notions by means of case studies within the framework of philosophical logic.

General characterization

Code

711031081

Credits

6.0

Responsible teacher

João de Deus Santos Sàágua

Hours

Weekly - 4

Total - 168

Teaching language

Portuguese

Prerequisites

Not applicable 

Bibliography

Davidson, Donald. 1967. “Truth and Meaning.” In Inquiries into Truth and Interpretation. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984.
Davidson, Donald. 1973. “Radical Interpretation.” In Inquiries into Truth and Interpretation. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984.
Grice, Paul. 1957. “Utterer´s Meaning and Intentions”. In Studies in the Way of Words. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1989.
Grice, Paul. 1969. “Meaning.” In Studies in the Way of Words. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1989.
Grice, Paul. 1975. “Logic and Conversation”. In Studies in the Way of Words. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1989.
Lewis, D. 1969. Convention: A Philosophical Study. ed. Oxford: Blackwell.
Kripke, S. A. 1972. Naming and Necessity. ed. Harvard University Press, 1980.
Putnam, Hilary. 1975. “The Meaning of ‘Meaning.’” In Philosophical Papers, Vol. 2: Mind, Language and Reality. Cambridge University Press, 1979.

Teaching method

As indicated in the syllabus, the course is divided in 3 blocks. In each block, we start from the careful reading and analysis of a few fundamental texts and build upon that the delimitation of the relevant philosophical problems, and the understanding and discussion of the views and answers proposed by the authors under study. Each block ends with the presentation and discussion of students’ papers on the topics in question.
Texts will be provided and studied in their original language, English.
For each block, each student must write a brief essay (5-10 pages), on the topics discussed. At least one of these texts must be presented and discussed in class.

 

 

Evaluation method

Paper 1: 25%. Paper 2: 25%. Paper 3: 25%.(75%), Participation in class, including the presentation and discussion of at least one paper(25%)

Subject matter

The course focuses on problems and discussions lying at the intersection between logic and the philosophical study of language.
In each of three blocks, based on the careful reading of various seminal texts, we address the specific contribution of authors of special relevance in the analytic tradition:
1. D. Davidson
1.1. Truth-theoretic semantics for natural languages — Davidson 1967;
1.2. Truth and rationality at the foundation of meaning — Davidson 1973;
2. P. Grice
2.1. Semantics versus pragmatics — Grice 1975;
2.2. Communicative intentions at the foundation of meaning — Grice 1957 e 1969;
3. D. Lewis, H. Putnam and S. Kripke
3.1. Conventional meanings — Lewis 1969;
3.2. Convention versus standard in a community; semantic externalism — Putnam 1975, Kripke 1972;
Two main questions secure the continuity of inquiry and discussion across the blocks:
A. What is the logical form of our linguistic expressions?
B. What is the logical substructure of our linguistic practices?

Programs

Programs where the course is taught: