International Relations

Objectives

  • 1: Provide students with a detailed series of analyses of contemporary international affairs from the social-scientific perspective of International Relations.
  • 2: Analyze and understand the major themes of international relations and global politics. Increase knowledge on issues pertaining to identity and its recognition in todays world, and also on the many tensions and conflicts that beset us all as we try to cope with the very rapid national, sub-national, regional and global transformations which give us no respite
  • 3: Develop an appreciation of theory and its utility in the study and practice of International Relations. Improve critical thinking and writing skills.
  • 4: Identify and critically discuss the influence and impact of a specific actor on contemporary global politics. 
  • 5: Demonstrate the ability to describe the social, political, and economic forces that influence social behavior and the global system
  • 6: Critically review and evaluate academic texts. Formulate constructive critique of fellow students' written assignments.
  • 7: To provide opportunities to undergraduate law students to link theory and practice, and to apply international affairs knowledge and skills in a practical problem-solving way to address issues of immediate international concern.

General characterization

Code

27136

Credits

4

Responsible teacher

Felipe Pathé Duarte

Hours

Weekly - 3

Total - 36

Teaching language

English

Prerequisites

Not Applicable

Bibliography

Baylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens, eds (2017). The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations. 7th edition;  Oxford University Press, 2017. 

 

Buzan, Barry, and Richard Little (2000). International Systems in World History: Remaking the Study of International Relations. Oxford University Press.

 

Cooper, Robert (2004), The Breaking of Nations: Order and Chaos in the 21st Century; Atlantic Books.

 

Fukuyama, Francis (1992) The End of History and the Last Man, Penguin Books, London, 1992 

 

Fukuyama, Francis (2018); Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment; Macmillan.

 

Gellner, Ernst (1987); Culture, Identity and Politics; Cambridge University Press.

 

Hollis, Martin and Smith, Steve (2004), Explaining and Understanding International Relations, London: Claredon

 

Huntington, Samuel (1993), 'The Clash of Civilizations?', Foreign Affairs 72(3): 1-25.

 

Kalyvas, Stathis N., Saphiro, Ian et. al. (ed.) (2008), Order, Conflict & Violence, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 

 

Kissinger, Henry (1994), 'The new world order', in Diplomacy: 17-29, New York: Simon & Schuster.

 

Nye, Joseph (2011), The Future of Power, New York: Public Affairs.

 

United Nations International Organization for Migration, World Migration Report 2020, pages 19-51.

  

* A complete version of the program, session by session and will a more detailed set of bibliographical reference for each and all of them will be made available to all. Moreover, a fuller set of Additional Readings will be included in that document.

Teaching method

  • Each session has a title, a summary and a bibliography. Sessions are also clustered into sets, which in turn narratively follow each other. The aim is to make the student cognizant with much of the scope of what has been produced in the last few years that may be of interest to his or her understanding of both law and politics. 
  • We always try to do so by digging deep into basic political categories and concepts and always dwelling into how these get tweaked by global processes of ever more robust interdependence. 
  • An interdisciplinary streak thus unavoidably permeates an effort such as this one. Understandably, particular care is taken with methodological and theoretical aspects of the discipline.
  • For each session a bibliography is provided. Most texts listed are either available at the links provided below references, in the Library, or free for download at the sites indicated. A few are not, but they are easy to find both on the internet or at neighbouring academic libraries.

Evaluation method

Ongoing assessment

  1. An individually written course paper in which the student chooses an issue related to one of the specific themes of the course and analyses it using one or more theoretical perspectives (about 3500/4000 words, - excluding footnotes and bibliography). It must have a cover, include title and author identification on the first page, uniform footnotes and final bibliography).
  2. written assignment submitted in connection with the seminars and oral presentation

(Final grade: 70% written course paper + 20% written assignment + overall performance in class as well as participation 10%

 

 

Or

 

 

Written exam

Subject matter

T1: GENERAL OPERATIONAL CONCEPTS AND HISTORY OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. ORDER AND DISORDER

  • Sedimentation of the Discipline of International Relations.
  • From the International System to the International Society.
  • Realism, Neo-realism, Liberalism and Structuralism.
  • Anarchy, Sovereignty, Self-Determination and Balance of Power.
  • War and International Stability.

 

T2: GLOBALIZATION AND THE END OF THE POST-1945 BIPOLAR WORLD

  • The end of the Cold War, the 'New World Order' and 9/11.
  • Globalization, Global Hierarchies, Global Inequalities and Identities.
  • Human Rights, Human Security and Humanitarian Intervention
  • Interdependence and Global Political Economy.
  • Globalization, Global Governance and Prospects for the Future.

 

T3: THE REGIONS OF THE WORLD. INTRODUCTION TO AREA STUDIES

  • European Union and the European Construction Process.
  • The Middle East Crises. From Sykes-Picot to the Syrian War.
  • The Importance of Asia-Pacific. China and the US Indo-Pacific Strategy.
  • Instability in Africa. Human Development and Governance Challenges. 
  • From 'Pax Americana' to the Power Dynamics of Latin America.

 

T4: ORDER AND DISORDER IN A GLOBAL WORLD: GEOPOLITICAL PERSPECTIVES AND CASE STUDIES

  • Social Movements, Populisms, Radicalization and Violent Extremism.
  • Coming Climate Disturbance. Global Health and International Order.
  • Cyberspace, Digitization and Big Data Policy.
  • Development, Migration and Refugees.
  • The Hybrid Threats.

 

 

 

 

Programs

Programs where the course is taught: